Daddy Bathing Me

When i was younger dad use to bath me years later i realised the way he washed me was very inappropriate where he washed me the positions he had me in it was more than naughty, and when mum was out he would get in with me and i washed him, i don't to give all the details yet, any other daughter had this experience, Jem,

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  • Richard P. Kluft, MD, PhD

    Volume 27, Issue 12

    The treatment of incest victims is often painful and difficult. With patience, the vast majority of those who have experienced incest can experience considerable improvement and enjoy an enhanced quality of life without succumbing to repeated victimization.

    Few subjects in psychiatry elicit more profound, visceral, and polarized reactions than incest-the occurrence of sexual behaviors between closely related individuals-behaviors that violate society’s most sacred and guarded taboos. Furthermore, few circumstances confront the psychiatrist with more complex, painful, and potentially problematic clinical dilemmas and challenges than the treatment of the incest victim and/or the management of situations in which incest has been suspected or alleged by one member of a family, and denied, often with both pain and outrage, by the accused and/or other members of that family.

    The study of incest as an actual phenomenon rather than as a fantasy is a relatively recent event. In 1975, an authoritative text proclaimed that the incidence of father-daughter incest in the United States was 1 in a million families.1 Crucial contributions by feminist authors and traumatologists rapidly sensitized the profession to the frequency and importance of incest and its association with psychopathology.2-4 By 1986, Russell5 wrote that some form of father-daughter incestuous activity, ranging from minimal to brutal and aggressive, was found in approximately 1 in 20 families that included daughters and their natural fathers, and 1 in 7 families in which daughters resided with a stepfather. By the early 1990s, feminists, traumatologists, and contributors from the emerging study of dissociative disorders were engaged in a vigorous study of incest and the treatment of incest victims.

  • However, during this time, there emerged a trend of calling into question the recollections of those who reported incestuous abuse, mounting militant defenses of accused perpetrators. The rising number of incest accusations was attributed to faulty practices on the part of therapists who worked with patients who recalled incest, especially if the recollections had been absent from memory for some time and emerged either in the context of therapy or with the patient’s exposure to certain media, books, and practices. Clinicians were accused of suggesting abuse that had never occurred and of causing their patients’ memories to be contaminated with information and/or ideas that had planted erroneous ideas in their minds. Certain books and media were accused of encouraging false reports.

    As a result, for over a decade and a half the study and treatment of incest has been under a cloud of suspicion that has impeded the advancement of knowledge about this devastating form of abuse. Scholars have backed away from even using the word, to the point that it has become difficult to research unless one searches under more bland and innocuous terms. Between the overall power of the incest taboo and scholars’ wish to avoid provoking acrimonious reactions to their work, the term “incest” has been receding from the literature.6 Even now, researchers rush to deny the frequency of incestuous abuse and to minimize its reality and the damage it can cause.7,8 However, a careful examination of the literature demonstrates that the arguments that childhood sexual mistreatment is not damaging are seriously flawed.

  • This is not the format in which to review 2 decades of acrimonious and polarized debate. I will proceed on the basis of what, in my view, are the best data and knowledge now available. That data and knowledge strongly affirm that abusive incest is common, that its consequences are detrimental, and that it usually leaves its victims with considerable psychiatric damage and distress.

    The contemporary study of incest and the contemporary treatment of incest victims proceed in the face of profound pressures to dissociate them from the mainstream of psychiatric concern. This avoidance, Courtois6(p19) notes, “flies in the face of the fact that research has consistently found that the majority of sexual abuse is perpetrated by someone known to or related to the child, and thus constitutes incest or is incestuous.9” Furthermore, although not all perpetrators have been victims, many have themselves been mistreated, and avoiding the study and treatment of incest, especially for male victims, bypasses an opportunity to reduce the pool of future sexual offenders.

  • CHECKPOINTS
    ? By 1986, some form of father-daughter incestuous activity, ranging from minimal to brutal and aggressive, was found in approximately 1 in 20 families that included daughters and their natural fathers, and 1 in 7 families in which daughters resided with a stepfather.

    ? Incest often leads to traumatic bonding, a form of relatedness in which one person mistreats the other with abuse, threats, intimidation, beatings, humiliations, and harassment but also provides attention, some form of affection, and connectedness.

    ? There are so many disincentives to revelation that many incest victims will undergo several rounds of psychiatric treatment before they risk revealing this aspect of their histories.

    ? When evaluating a patient, attention must be paid to evidence of dissociation in the patient’s history and to the patient’s overall symptoms. Appropriate treatment is geared toward each individual patient-not around the problem, the relevant diagnoses, or a particular theoretical model.

    #THE REAL SIDE OF INCEST

  • So, what's the problem??

  • The problem is the fake incest pedophilia here.

  • My husband does not fuck me. I am looking for sex chat. Chat with me now: https://ujeb.se/gprHh

  • Texas infant dies in sexual assault, father charged
    An autopsy found the 9-month-old was sexually assaulted and died during the attack
    A Houston man faces capital murder charges in connection with the death of his 9-month-old daughter, whose body investigators said showed signs of sexual assault.
    Harris County sheriff’s deputies went to an apartment complex just after midnight on Aug. 24 for reports of an unresponsive infant, according to authorities.

    When they arrived, emergency medical workers already were treating the child, identified as Savayah Mason – but she was pronounced dead at the hospital.

    A Harris County Institute of Forensics autopsy found that she had been sexually assaulted and died of asphyxiation during the attack, according to a news release from the sheriff’s office.

    Authorities launched a homicide investigation and interviewed her father, 23-year-old Luis Luna. On Monday, they charged him with capital murder in connection with his daughter’s death. He was taken into custody without incident.

    “Heartbreaking,” Sheriff Ed Gonzalez tweeted after the arrest. “Worst type of cases. May this little angel rest in peace.”

    #THE REAL SIDE OF INCEST

  • Baby Girl Dies After Sexual Assault; Father Charged
    Austin Stevens, 29, of Lower Providence Township, was arrested and charged with involuntary deviant sexual intercourse, rape of a child and other related offenses. A baby girl died after she was raped by her father, who waited for an hour to call 911 at his Montgomery County home, investigators said.

    Austin Stevens, 29, of Lower Providence Township, was arrested and charged with involuntary deviant sexual intercourse, rape of a child, aggravated assault, aggravated indecent assault, endangering the welfare of a child and other related offenses.
    On Saturday at 10:40 p.m., police were called to a home on the 3400 block of Germantown Road in Lower Providence Township, Pennsylvania, for a report of an unresponsive infant. When they arrived they found Stevens with his unresponsive 10-month-old daughter Zara Scruggs. Scruggs was taken to Einstein Medical Center Montgomery, where she was pronounced dead at 12:12 a.m. on Sunday.
    By David Chang • Published October 6, 2020 • Updated on October 7, 2020 at 2:09 am
    #THE REAL SIDE OF INCEST

  • Fuck off pedo I would pay for a video of someone executing you sick fuck!

  • Fake cake incest pedophilic propaganda! You haven't fucked anything but Mary Palm ( Rosy or sister Mary what ever you like dumb fuck) and her five children.

  • Leviticus 20:11
    
“‘If a man has sexual relations with his father’s wife, he has dishonored his father. Both the man and the woman are to be put to death; their blood will be on their own heads.

  • I would have spent a lot of time washing your pussy, making sure to clean it thoroughly.

  • Me too

  • Fuck off pedo I would pay for a video of someone executing you sick fuck.

  • Ou should be telling this to the police,

  • Get a shrink and a rope. Maybe the shrink will talk you out of using the rope. We hope the shrink helps tighten the noose around your neck.

  • Come on. Give us something new.

  • How long did it take to write that fake incest pedophilic crap?

  • You should be telling this to the police, not posting it here if it is real!!!
    But since it is fake Fuck you dude. Fuck you and your sick pedophilic post ASS HOLE!

  • Shut the fuck up lady balls

  • Understanding and treating survivors of incest
    By David M. Lawson
    March 6, 2018

    Adults with histories of being abused as children present unique challenges for counselors. For instance, these clients often struggle with establishing and maintaining a therapeutic alliance. They may rapidly shift their notion of the counselor from very favorable to very unfavorable in line with concomitant shifts in their emotional states. Furthermore, they may anxiously expect the counselor to abandon them and thus increase pressure on the counselor to prove otherwise. Ironically, attempts at reassurance by the counselor may actually serve to validate these clients’ fears of abandonment.
    The motivating factor for many of these clients is mistrust of people in general — and often for good reason. This article explores the psychological and interpersonal aspect of child sexual abuse by a parent and its treatment, with a particular focus on its relationship to betrayal trauma, dissociation and complex trauma.
    Incest and its effects
    Child abuse of any kind by a parent is a particularly negative experience that often affects survivors to varying degrees throughout their lives. However, child sexual abuse committed by a parent or other relative — that is, incest — is associated with particularly severe psychological symptoms and physical injuries for many survivors. For example, survivors of father-daughter incest are more likely to report feeling depressed, damaged and psychologically injured than are survivors of other types of child abuse. They are also more likely to report being estranged from one or both parents and having been shamed by others when they tried to share their experience. Additional symptoms include low self-esteem, self-loathing, somatization, low self-efficacy, pervasive interpersonal difficulties and feelings of contamination, worthlessness, shame and helplessness.

  • One particularly damaging result of incest is trauma bonding, in which survivors incorporate the aberrant views of their abusers about the incestuous relationship. As a result, victims frequently associate the abuse with a distorted form of caring and affection that later negatively influences their choice of romantic relationships. This can often lead to entering a series of abusive relationships.
    According to Christine Courtois (Healing the Incest Wound: Adult Survivors in Therapy) and Richard Kluft (“Ramifications of incest” in Psychiatric Times), greater symptom severity for incest survivors is associated with:
    * Longer duration of abuse
    * Frequent abuse episodes
    * Penetration
    * High degree of force, coercion and intimidation
    * Transgenerational incest
    * A male perpetrator
    * Closeness of the relationship
    * Passive or willing participation
    * Having an erotic response
    * Self-blame and shame
    * Observed or reported incest that continues
    * Parental blame and negative judgment
    * Failed institutional responses: shaming, blaming, ineffectual effort
    * Early childhood onset

  • * Early childhood onset
    Incest that begins at a young age and continues for protracted periods — the average length of incest abuse is four years — often results in avoidance-based coping skills (for example, avoidance of relationships and various dissociative phenomena). These trauma-forged coping skills form the foundation for present and future interpersonal interactions and often become first-line responses to all or most levels of distress-producing circumstances.
    More than any other type of child abuse, incest is associated with secrecy, betrayal, powerlessness, guilt, conflicted loyalty, fear of reprisal and self-blame/shame. It is of little surprise then that only 30 percent of incest cases are reported by survivors. The most reliable research suggests that 1 in 20 families with a female child have histories of father-daughter child sexual abuse, whereas 1 in 7 blended families with a female child have experienced stepfather-stepdaughter child sexual abuse (see the revised edition of The Secret Trauma: Incest in the Lives of Girls and Women by Diana E. H. Russell, published in 1999).
    In 1986, David Finkelhor, known for his work on child sexual abuse, indicated that among males who reported being sexually abused as children, 3 percent reported mother-son incest. However, most incest-related research has focused on father-daughter or stepfather-stepdaughter incest, which is the focus of this article.

  • Subsequent studies of incest survivors indicated that being eroticized early in life disrupted these individuals’ adult sexuality. In comparison with nonincest controls, survivors experienced sexual intercourse earlier, had more sex partners, were more likely to have casual sex with those outside of their primary relationships and were more likely to engage in sex for money. Thus, survivors of incest are at an increased risk for revictimization, often without a conscious realization that they are being abused. This issue often creates confusion for survivors because the line between involuntary and voluntary participation in sexual behavior is blurred.
    An article by Sandra Stroebel and colleagues, published in 2013 in Sexual Abuse: A Journal of Research and Treatment, indicates that risk factors for father-daughter incest include the following:
    * Exposure to parent verbal or physical violence
    * Families that accept father-daughter nudity
    * Families in which the mother never kisses or hugs her daughter (overt maternal affection was identified as a protective factor against father-daughter incest)
    * Families with an adult male other than the biological father in the home (i.e., a stepfather or substitute father figure)

  • Finally, some qualitative research notes that in limited cases, mothers with histories of being sexually abused as a child wittingly or unwittingly contribute to the causal chain of events leading to father-daughter incest. Furthermore, in cases in which a mother chooses the abuser over her daughter, the abandonment by the mother may have a greater negative impact on her daughter than did the abuse itself. This rejection not only reinforces the victim’s sense of worthlessness and shame but also suggests to her that she somehow “deserved” the abuse. As a result, revictimization often becomes the rule rather than the exception, a self-fulfilling prophecy that validates the victim’s sense of core unworthiness.

  • Beyond the physical and psychological harm caused by father-daughter incest, Courtois notes that the resulting family dynamics are characterized by:
    * Parent conflict
    * Contradicting messages
    * Triangulation (for example, parents aligned against the child or perpetrator parent-child alignment against the other parent)
    * Improper parent-child alliances within an atmosphere of denial and secrecy
    Furthermore, victims are less likely to receive support and protection due to family denial and loyalty than if the abuser were outside the family or a stranger. Together, these circumstances often create for survivors a distorted sense of self and distorted relationships with self and others. If the incest begins at an early age, survivors often develop an inherent sense of mistrust and danger that pervades and mediates their perceptions of relationships and the world as a whole.

    #THE REAL SIDE OF INCEST

  • Sorry, I dosed off. What was that again?

  • You should be telling this to the police, not posting it here if it is real!!!
    But since it is fake Fuck you dude. Fuck you and your sick pedophilic post ASS HOLE

  • Rubbish

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